Disruptive mobile technologies enter the future


I recently spoke with Fay Arjomandi, global lead of Vodafone xone, a business unit that focuses on finding and cultivating startups that produce disruptive mobile solutions in Vodafone Europe, Middle East, Asia (EMEA) markets. She foresees some disruptive (and quite interesting) mobile technologies in our business and personal futures.

Welcome to the “Internet of Me”
When it comes to disruptive mobile technologies for the consumer, Arjomandi opens with, “Everybody is trying to define their role in the next wave.” She also credits cellular communications as personalizing telephony for consumers as the number of subscribers has exploded. (There are 6.8 billion mobile customers worldwide, and there is one smartphone for every five people, according to some recent numbers she came across.)

One disruptive mobile consumer technology she sees in the future is the “Internet of Me.” She explains it as a system responding to a mobile user’s needs in a very dynamic and autonomic way.

“It’s about getting my music when I need it, content when I need it,” Arjomandi explains. The “Internet of Me” transcends content and device ecosystems as it pushes content to a mobile user. It provides freedom of access to anything the users need.

She also sees self-optimized networks (SON) — she uses the term self-optimized system (SOS) — in the future. SOS is a system that is so intelligent, and in which everything is interconnected so thoroughly, that it knows the user well enough to evolve with the user through the day. Arjomandi gave the example of the technology knowing that after a full day of work you are tired, so it sends your calls to voice mail, except those from people you specify. The SOS even starts the dinner you placed in the microwave that morning.

Run your business and your personal life from one device “The border between consumer and enterprise is getting blurrier every day,” says Arjomandi. She predicts the further rise of “prosumer” mobile technologies as mobile workers continue to shift between personal and business tasks on their mobile device throughout the business day.

In her predicted rise of “prosumer” technologies, Arjomandi sees more mobile solutions in 2014 and beyond that enable users to run and manage business tasks, whether one is discovering sales results, website engagement statistics, IT system performance, or staff attendance and time tracking.

Signs of this prediction are already appearing as startups and major enterprise app vendors alike are adopting mobile first strategies and as more intelligent mobile and cloud technologies launch, offering more highly mobile options for business users to interact with backend systems.

Toward a future of mobile disruption Arjomandi points to a future where enterprise mobile users will have even greater convergence over personal and business tasks on their mobile devices. There are consumer, smart home, and even enterprise mobile technologies taking shape that are feeding into Arjomandi’s predictions about the future of disruptive mobile technologies.

What disruptive mobile technologies do you predict in your professional and personal future?

Image by nokhoog_buchachon courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net.

Will Kelly is a technical writer and analyst based in the Washington, DC area. His writing experience also includes writing technology articles for CNET TechRepublic and other sites. Will’s technology interests include collaboration platforms, enterprise mobility, Bring Your Own Device (BYOD), project management applications, and big data. Follow him on Twitter: @willkelly.

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